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Building a Cannabis Tolerance

Could Building Up A Cannabis Tolerance Be Good For You?

Building up a tolerance to cannabis typically seems to be viewed as a bad thing and something to overcome. But, what if building up a tolerance meant that you received an increase in medicinal benefits with none of the adverse side effects? What exactly is a cannabis tolerance? The definition of cannabis tolerance is that you gradually acclimate to its effects. It refers to a tolerance to the psychotropic effects of THC. In other words, when you build up a tolerance, you need to ingest more cannabis to experience the same psychotropic effects that you felt previously. This article examines the benefits of building up a cannabis tolerance.

Each person is unique and their tolerance level depends on many different factors; frequency of consumption, body mass, gender, potency of the product and the delivery method. In some cases, new users do not feel the psychotropic effects at first because their CB1 receptors in the brain have not been activated by the cannabinoids in cannabis. With increased cannabis usage, there are also possible side effects like difficulty in focusing, short-term memory problems and coordination problems. Many people find it very difficult to do their jobs, if they require focus and concentration, or drive a car when they are under the influence of THC.

When you build up a tolerance, the typical protocol is to have a tolerance break. That involves abstaining from cannabis usage for a few days to a few weeks depending on your individual tolerance level. This allows your system to reset back to a time when you experienced a greater psychotropic effect. Also, consistent cannabis microdosing has been proven to help users avoid building up a tolerance.

Why would you choose to build up a greater tolerance, you might ask? For medical cannabis patients, building up a cannabis tolerance increases the quantities of cannabinoids entering their endocannabinoid system while minimizing the adverse side effects. They are able to function adequately while maintaining a high level of cannabis usage which controls their symptoms, especially those experiencing chronic pain and anxiety. In the case of cancer patients, which requires very large doses of RSO in order to kill the cancer cells, being able to function while using cannabis is paramount to helping them to cope with their disease. They are able to ingest large quantities of cannabinoids while no longer experiencing the disorienting effects.

How do you build up a cannabis tolerance?

  1. Ingest cannabis on a daily basis and multiple times a day. If this is not possible, use it at least once every two days.
  2. Start using stronger strains that contain more THC. Make sure you are in a safe place as you are increasing your tolerance level in case the adverse side effects are debilitating.
  3. Increase your dosage at the right time of day for you; at a time when you receive the most medical benefits.
  4. Take precautions so that you don’t get too impaired. Don’t use cannabis on an empty stomach. If you feel really out of control, CBD will counteract the effects of the THC.
  5. It is not uncommon for you to experience gradual increases until you reach a plateau. If you experience a tolerance to a particular strain, switch to a different strain.
  6. When building up a cannabis tolerance, it is helpful to track your experiences in a log.
  7. It is possible to maintain a stable dosage for extended periods of time.

There is no good reason to suffer through days of incapacity when you experience cannabis tolerance. By gradually increasing it, you can maintain a cannabis dosage that keeps your symptoms under control.

Feel free to add any additional comments on successfully building up a cannabis tolerance.

Source: cannabisnow.com Don’t Knock a Strong Cannabis Tolerance, It Could Help You Heal, Emily Earlenbaugh, April, 2017

wikileaf.com, Weed Tolerance: How Do You Increase It? Jenn Keeler, March 2018.

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